England fell short at the final hurdle, losing to Italy on penalties in the European Championship final. 

Over the course of the tournament, a number of players emerged to establish themselves as guaranteed starters while others reminded everyone of their quality.

Telegraph Sport assesses how every member of the England squad performed over the course of the tournament

Jordan Pickford

Any doubts over the Everton goalkeeper’s form were dispelled quickly as he kept clean sheets in his first five games of the tournament. He only conceded from Mikkel Damsgaard’s free-kick when Denmark had an illegal wall, then in the final from a scrappy set-play in a match where he otherwise was one of England’s best players. 

9/10

Kyle Walker

His pace was a valuable part of Gareth Southgate’s defence. He managed to get his team-mates out of trouble many times with his recovery runs and also moved the ball forward quickly whether he was in his usual full-back role or as a third centre-back in a three-man backline. 

9/10

Luke Shaw

Established himself as England’s first-choice left-back after Kieran Trippier switched flanks for the opening win against Croatia. Shaw’s form carried on from last season when he played so well for Manchester United. He was pushed forward to set up goals with crosses and his early strike against Italy in the final had fans dreaming of glory. 

9/10

John Stones

Put in huge performances in the big matches, especially against Germany in the second round when there was no way past. This time last season his future at Manchester City looked uncertain but he was among the first names of the team-sheet after forcing his way back into the Southgate’s plans. 

9/10

Harry Maguire

England’s defence looked completely different and felt more secure when Maguire returned from the ankle injury that ruled him out of the final part of the season. After getting himself fit for the final group game, there was no time to settle in and he was up to speed immediately.  

9/10

Harry Maguire hit the ground running after a disrupted end to the club season

Credit: AP

Kieran Trippier

His versatility was important for Southgate, who wanted his security to face the Croatians in the first game of the tournament. When England reached the final, he was pushed forward as a wing-back and set up Shaw’s goal with an excellent cross. Memorable season after winning La Liga with Atletico Madrid.

8/10

Tyrone Mings

Stepped in for Maguire as a left-sided centre-back for the matches against Croatia and Scotland and helped keep a clean sheet in both of them, then added another sub appearance against Czech Republic. Maguire’s fitness was never a certainty and Mings was ready to deputise. 

7/10

Conor Coady

Such an important character to have around the squad, always upbeat despite not making it onto the pitch during the tournament. 

N/A

Ben Chilwell

Unfortunate to be in isolation for close-contact with Scotland’s Billy Gilmour when the final group game would have been his best chance of getting on the pitch.  

N/A

Ben White

Last-minute call-up to replace Trent Alexander-Arnold and was the centre-back who missed out when Southgate trimmed his matchday squad to 23. 

N/A

Reece James

His only appearance was the full match in the 0-0 against Scotland. He will be one for the future with his pace and ability to play as a centre-back in a three-man backline. But it is difficult to argue with Southgate’s selection given the form of Walker and the way Trippier was used at wing-back. 

6/10

Reece James failed to break into England's strongest side

Credit: GETTY IMAGES

Declan Rice

His running in midfield during the final gave England a real chance of glory. The West Ham midfielder covers so much ground protecting his defence but also raiding forward or pressing opposition higher up the pitch. He will be a mainstay of the England midfield for many years on this evidence. 

9/10

Jack Grealish

Fans kept chanting his name as they wanted him introduced off the subs’ bench and when he came on he always made an impact. Against Germany he produced an assist for Harry Kane and also teed up Luke Shaw for the cross tucked away by Raheem Sterling. His one start came against Czech Republic.

 8/10

Jordan Henderson

Recovered from his groin injury in time for the tournament and he came off the bench in every knockout game, scoring his first goal for his country in the win over Ukraine in Rome. He was one of Southgate’s “finishers” to see out games, although was taken off the end as penalties loomed. 

7/10

Kalvin Phillips

This will be a tournament remembered for Phillips emerging as a huge talent for England. He was not in his “Yorkshire Pirlo” role for Leeds United where he dictates the game but had energy to get support his forwards as well as be disciplined to make sure England were secure. His clash against Toni Kroos in the Germany midfielder’s final international game was proper battle. 

9/10

Mason Mount

He was in isolation with Chilwell which led to missing the Czech Republic game and not being ready for Germany when he was released. But he is one of the players Southgate always turns to in the big matches for his ability to link the midfield and attack when he receives the ball and turns. 

8/10

Phil Foden

Suffered injury heartbreak when he picked up a foot problem on the eve of the final and missed out on being on the bench. He started the tournament on the right wing – the opposite flank to where he normally plays for Manchester City – but was overtaken by Bukayo Saka in the pecking order. 

6/10

Bukayo Saka

One of the star players of the tournament, which is what should be remembered rather than his penalty being saved in the final. His fearless, direct running on the right wing troubled opposition full-backs. The Arsenal forward is one of the popular players in the squad and his team-mates will rally around him now. 

9/10

Bukayo Saka's dribbling caused problems for opposition throughout the tournament

Credit: PA

Jude Bellingham

Showed maturity on the ball when he was brought off the bench against Croatia, Czech Republic and Ukraine, taking on players and showing no signs of being overawed by the occasion. It will not be long before he challenges for a first-team place given his progress at Borussia Dortmund and this summer with England. 

7/10

Harry Kane

Stayed calm and led by example when the group stage saw him draw a blank, insisting the goals would come. And they did against Germany, Ukraine and finally against Denmark to book a place in the final. His speeches before matches in the dressing room rallied players and he returned to form himself. 

8/10

Raheem Sterling

Without his goals England would be scrapping to get into the second round. Some questioned his form heading into the tournament but winners against Croatia and Czech Republic were essential for England to progress. In the semi-finals he was clearly the man-of-the-match and his goal against Germany was the moment that had the nation celebrating. 

10/10

Marcus Rashford

Recently suggested he was struggling with injury issues last season and found himself on bench behind Foden and Saka, then Jadon Sancho when Southgate changed it for the quarter-finals. Will be looking to win his place back as a starting player next season. 

6/10

Jadon Sancho

Was left out of the first matchday squad altogether and only got six minutes of action in the group stages. His only start saw him do well against Ukraine in Rome, then he was given a minute before the penalties in the final. That start in the quarter-finals was a glimpse of what he is capable of next season at Manchester United. 

6/10

Dominic Calvert-Lewin

Was another player who had spells in the stands when the final 23 matchday players were picked but got some minutes against Croatia and Ukraine to see out victories. Showed a good attitude to play back-up to Harry Kane and be ready to come off the bench if needed. 

6/10