Security will be stepped up at Wembley for Sunday’s European Championship final following the laser-pen incident that saw England charged by Uefa.

The number of stewards on duty for the game will be increased in a crackdown on prohibited items, as well as on fans trying to gain entry to the ground without a ticket, the Daily Telegraph has been told.

There were claims during England’s semi-final victory over Denmark on Wednesday that ticketless supporters had bypassed Wembley’s electronic turnstiles but those responsible for policing the stadium said there was no evidence any attempt to do so had been successful.

Uefa opened proceedings against England on Thursday over the “use of a laser pointer” which appeared to be shone in the face of Denmark goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel before Harry Kane’s semi-final-deciding penalty.

Kane’s penalty was saved by Schmeichel but the Tottenham striker scored on the rebound to put England 2-1 in front.

Television footage later revealed that someone in the crowd shone a green laser pen in Schmeichel’s face in the moments before Kane stepped up to take it.

Speaking to Danish media following the defeat, Schmeichel said "I did not experience [the laser pen] on the penalty kick because it was behind me on my right side.

"But I experienced it in the second half. I told the referee. And he went to say something to one of the other officials."

It was an unsavoury scene that drew condemnation from England fans on social media. And on Thursday morning Uefa also acted, with “the use of a laser point by its supporters” coming under one of three issues levelled at England following the match.

The other two were “disturbance caused by supporters during the national anthem” – England fans booed the Danish national anthem – and “lighting of fireworks by supporters” – in England’s case, inside of Wembley.

The case will be dealt with “in due course”.

That was not the end of the controversy around the winning goal either, with there being a second ball on the pitch moments before Raheem Sterling won the penalty. The incident drew plenty of ire from the Danish press, who complained about play being allowed to continue.