She taught at Shamblehurst Primary School (Image: Googlemaps)

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A primary school teacher has been banned from the profession after shouting at pupils and leaving them scared.

Hannah Rhodes shouted at one pupil while he was in a foetal position, crying uncontrollably and visibly scared.

A witness recalled seeing the teacher stood over the child, referred to as pupil A, while shouting at him, Hampshire Live reports.

On another occasion, Ms Rhodes shouted at up to two other pupils, referred to as Pupil B and Pupil C, which resulted in them becoming scared to ask her for help, and ultimately caused one to want to move school.

Ms Rhodes, 37, was a teacher at Shamblehurst Primary School in Hedge End, near Southampton but in the Eastleigh borough, when the misconduct offences took place in October and November 2018.

She was employed there as a teacher from January 2015 until she resigned in October 2019.

Following a professional conduct panel of the Teaching Regulation Authority, it was decided that Ms Rhodes would be banned from the profession indefinitely after being found guilty of unacceptable professional conduct.

In a report published online, the information said that Ms Rhodes was found to have shouted at Pupil A in October 2018 after finding out that he had urinated in a bush.

It read: "For those reasons, the panel found that Pupil A was vulnerable and that Ms Rhodes actions were particularly grave, especially given a member of staff had already dealt with the incident negating the need for Ms Rhodes to take further action regarding the incident."

In November 2018, Ms Rhodes shouted at Pupil B and/or Pupil C, resulting in them becoming scared to ask for help.

There was evidence provided from Pupil B's mother explaining how her child had been shouted at for getting the wrong answer to a question in class.

Further evidence suggested Pupil B "became so scared of Ms Rhodes that he made a tick chart to count down the days to when Individual D [name redacted] would be teaching him".

These actions caused the pupil to lose confidence and/or think they were stupid.

The panel found it more probable than not that Ms Rhodes shouted at Pupil C, and there was evidence from the child's parents stating that the child had to be removed from the school because he was "generally miserable at the fact he has to be in the same room as her [Ms Rhodes]".

Ms Rhodes did not attend the hearing and was not represented, and prior to the hearing admitted the allegations in their entirety.

She also admitted that the facts of the allegations against her amounted to unacceptable professional conduct and/or conduct that may bring the profession into disrepute.

However, the panel found some allegations not proved, such as one that alleged that Ms Rhodes caused another colleague to suffer a panic attack.

The panel considered a letter that was sent to Ms Rhodes by the school in March 2018 which discussed a number of separate events and made it clear that they should not be repeated.

The panel concluded that "whilst Ms Rhodes' actions continued to be undesirable in many respects", "it did not consider that there was enough reliable evidence before it, which suggested, on the balance of probabilities, that any of these specific events were repeated".

Information from the hearing said: "The panel was struck by the volume of evidence, which suggested Ms Rhodes had a propensity to target those who were vulnerable and by doing so, act in a wholly unprofessional and at times, degrading, way.

"The panel's concerns were further elevated when considering safeguarding. In this case, not only did Ms Rhodes fail to appreciate and respond appropriately (by not amending her approach to pupils) to safeguarding concerns, she was in fact, the root cause of those safeguarding concerns, particularly in regard to Pupils A, B and C.

"The panel considered that her actions amounted to emotional abuse compounded by the fact the evidence suggested a regression in the development and confidence of the pupils and that, even after the passage of time, some pupils recalled being fearful of Ms Rhodes."

The report added that Ms Rhodes was considered to have "lacked any depth and true insight into the harm she caused" and there was "no meaningful reflection as to the situation she had found herself, and how she would deal with similar challenges".

Ms Rhodes will not be entitled to apply for restoration of her eligibility to teach.