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The heavy toll of Covid saw the number of people without a job rocket across the UK with over half a million still unemployed – but what is the rate in your area?

Official figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show while the number of people in work throughout the country has fallen by 553,000 since last spring, the number of people on payrolls rose by 197,000 between April and May this year.

This is thanks in large part to the hospitality and retail sector being able to re-open on April 12 in England.

However, the economy is still severely behind and the release of the numbers comes after industry bosses warned many businesses may struggle to stave off liquidation after the final phase of the road map was delayed from June 21.

Are you out of work, having lost your job during the pandemic? Tell us your story at [email protected]

Ladywood in central Birmingham is among the areas in the UK to have seen a spike in unemployment
(Image: Darren Quinton/Birmingham Live)

Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced last night the full lifting of Covid measures had been postponed until at least July 19, to ensure more people have been vaccinated amid the surge of the Delta variant.

Sam Beckett, ONS head of economic statistics, said: "The number of employees on payroll grew strongly in May, up by almost 200,000, although it is still over half a million down since the pandemic struck.

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"Job vacancies continued to recover in the spring, and our early estimates suggest that by May the total had surpassed its pre-pandemic level, with strong growth in sectors such as hospitality."

"Meanwhile the redundancy rate remains subdued, while the number of employees on furlough has continued to decline."

Below is a region by region breakdown of the unemployment situation across the UK, as well as the 10 areas with the highest percentage unemployment increase year-on-year.

The number of people in work has fallen by over half a million during the pandemic
(Image: Getty Images)

London saw the highest spike in unemployment over the pandemic, with East Ham hit hardest at 2.1 per cent, while Ladywood in central Birmingham and Bradford West saw the biggest jump outside the capital.

Also, aside from London, each region of the UK saw the claimant count for benefits for men drop more than women over the year.

10 areas with the highest unemployment increase:

The below 10 areas saw the biggest increase in unemployment between May 2020 and May 2021

East Ham (London) 2.1 percent

Tottenham (London) 1.8 percent

Edmonton (London) 1.8 percent

Brent Central (London) 1.7 percent

West Ham (London) 1.5 percent

Southall, Ealing (London) 1.5 percent

Feltham and Heston (London) 1.3 percent

Illford South (London) 1.2 percent

Ladywood (Birmingham) 1.2 percent

Bradford West (Yorkshire) 1.2 percent

Eight parts of London make up the top 10 UK spots that have seen the biggest unemployment leap
(Image: AFP via Getty Images)

Unemployment figures by region

The following data shows the out-of-work benefits claimant count as of May 13 and is broken into gender, with percent of the population in brackets. It then shows the change on year with percentage difference in brackets.

Out-of-work benefits claimant count on May 13 against last year's figures UK

Men 1,482,450 (7.1), -143,275 (-0.7)

Women 1,020,705 (4.9), -14,910 (-0.1)

People 2,503,160 (6.0), -158,180 (-0.4)

England

Men: 1,263,275 (7.2), -111,765 (-0.6)

Women: 884,860 (5.0), -4,955 (0.0)

People: 2,148,130 (6.1), -116,720 (-0.3)

North East

Men: 68,700 (8.3), -9,860 (-1.2)

Women: 43,425 (5.2), -1,970 (-0.2)

People: 112,120 (6.8), -11,830 (-0.7)

North West

Men: 185,140 (8.1), -18,495 (-0.8)

Women: 117,890 (5.2), -4,965 (-0.2)

People: 303,030 (6.6), -23,460 (-0.5)

Yorkshire and the Humber

Men: 127,560 (7.5), -12,840 (-0.8)

Women: 85,345 (5.0), -640 (0.0)

People: 212,905 (6.2), -13,480 (-0.4)

East Midlands

Men: 90,885 (6.1), -13,520 (-0.9)

Women: 63,655 (4.2), -2,665 (-0.2)

People: 154,545 (5.2), -16,180 (-0.5)

West Midlands

Men: 151,720 (8.3), -10,315 (-0.6)

Women: 103,635 (5.7), 1,695 (0.1)

People: 255,355 (7.0), -8,620 (-0.2)

East

Men: 112,390 (6.0), -16,770 (-0.9)

Women: 82,735 (4.3), -3,075 (-0.2)

People: 195,130 (5.2), -19,845 (-0.5)

London

Men: 275,140 (9.0), 11,175 (0.4)

Women: 209,790 (7.0), 19,100 (0.6)

People: 484,930 (8.0), 30,275 (0.5)

South East

Men: 160,250 (5.7), -21,565 (-0.8)

Women: 114,555 (4.1), -4,165 (-0.1)

People: 274,810 (4.9), -25,730 (-0.5)

South West

Men: 91,485 (5.4), -19,580 (-1.2)

Women: 63,820 (3.8), -8,270 (-0.5)

People: 155,310 (4.6), -27,855 (-0.8)

Wales

Men: 62,840 (6.5), -10,660 (-1.1)

Women: 41,570 (4.3), -3,010 (-0.3)

People: 104,410 (5.4), -13,665 (-0.7)

Scotland

Men: 121,855 (7.1), -13,505 (-0.8)

Women: 74,465 (4.2), -4,730 (-0.3)

People: 196,320 (5.6), -18,235 (-0.5)

Northern Ireland

Men: 34,485 (5.9), -7,345 (-1.3)

Women: 19,820 (3.3), -2,215 (-0.4)

People: 54,300 (4.6), -9,560 (-0.8)