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You can't beat a good mascot.

High fives, dancing, general crowd-pleasing – what's not to like?

And there will be plenty of eyes on the face of a tournament as big as Euro 2020.

This year will see the delayed competition take place in 11 different countries, starting on June 11 and finishing a month later with the final at Wembley Stadium.

So it's a big job ahead of this years mascot – but who will be in the role for Euro 2020?

In March 2019, UEFA announced Skillzy as the mascot for the tournament during a qualifying match between the Netherlands and Germany at the Johan Cruijff ArenA in Amsterdam.

Football freestyler Skillzy is the official mascot of Euro 2020
(Image: Claudio Villa)

Described by UEFA as “a larger-than-life character inspired by freestyling, street and panna culture,” the human-like cartoon mascot, rocks a topknot and has a fair few skills in his locker.

During the video you can see some of the world’s best freestylers showing off their skills around the centre-circle of the pitch, before pointing to a podium that Skillzy, Liv Cooke and Tobias Becs are standing on.

The trio jog to the edge of the centre-circle, where Cooke and Becs then do some keepy-uppys while sat down, before getting up and Skillzy doing an “around the world” to finish.

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Cooke, who is one of the world’s best freestylers, said the following on the competition’s website about freestyling being the main aspect of the mascot:

"Being able to take the beauty of freestyling, street football and panna to football fans all over Europe is a really special opportunity.

"Whether it's playing in the park or on the world stage, whether it is football or freestyling, it's about expressing yourself with the ball at your feet."

UEFA’s aim with Skillzy is to interact more with its younger fans. This, the message from Guy-Laurent Epstein, marketing director of UEFA Events SA . He said:

"We wanted to move away from the traditional mascot that we have seen at previous UEFA EUROs in order to create a symbol that is able to interact more closely with football fans across the continent.

"It is important that UEFA appeals to football fans of all ages, and by creating a mascot which is actually able to physically play the game we all love, this will inspire youngsters from Dublin to Baku to try and emulate the tricks that Skillzy, Liv Cooke and Tobias Becs are able to master.”

It looks as if UEFA have followed the trend of human-like mascots with their choice for EURO 2020. In the tournament five years ago, Super Victor, another cartoon style mascot, was chosen to be the face of the competition.

What do you think about Skillzy? Let us know your thoughts below.