Steven Freeman has died from coronavirus (Image: Central News)

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One of the UK's worst paedophiles, who wanted to abolish the age of consent, has died with coronavirus.

Steven Freeman, 66, was locked up in HMP Bure, near Norwich, when he fell sick with Covid-19 and had to be rushed to hospital.

Freeman, who led the notorious Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE) group, reportedly tested positive for the disease on December 17.

The paedophile was taken to Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital on December 20 after a sharp decline in his health.

He previously campaigned for the abolition of the age of consent as part of PIE, before being jailed in 2011 after police found 3,000 horrific drawings in his London home.

During a raid on his house officers discovered the harrowing pictures, some of which showed children being raped.

He was locked up in HMP Bure, near Norwich
(Image: Archant)

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He held weekly meetings at his property to view and exchange child abuse images.

A Prison Service spokesman said: “HMP Bure prisoner Steven Freeman died in hospital died on 5 January.

The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has been informed.”

Freeman was serving an Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) sentence, which meant he was locked up indefinitely.

The sentences were introduced by the Labour government in 2003 and came into force in 2005.

They were designed to keep dangerous criminals who had not committed offences warranting a life sentence off the streets until they no longer posed a danger to the public.

Seven years after their introduction they were banned following a damning European Court of Human Rights ruling, yet those currently serving them were not released.